Nature

Throughout its history, visitors have sought out The Lexington Cemetery from far and near for its beautiful serene environment. Central Kentuckians have come to enjoy the three lakes with their peaceful fountains, Weeping Willow trees and ducks, as well as the formal flower gardens and other horticultural treasures that can be found in the nationally acclaimed arboretum. Situated on 170 acres of land, The Lexington Cemetery has over 200 species of trees including beautiful flowering dogwoods, crab apples, ornamental magnolias and pink weeping cherries. Because of the careful planning of cemetery trustees, general managers and Miles Penn, the current cemetery horticulturalist, visitors can find numerous gardens of annuals and perennials that are as beautiful today as they were when the gardens were established in 1963 under the direction of Richard Allison, the third cemetery general manager.

Some original trees that grew in the rural woods before the establishment of the cemetery still stand today. However, due to infestations, diseases, decay, erosion and natural disasters of high winds, lightening and ice storms, The Lexington Cemetery has had to regularly prune and replace trees and shrubs throughout its history to maintain the beauty of the grounds. Informational and educational public presentations are held annually to allow the cemetery staff to share the beauty and history of the grounds with the community.

Horticulture

With over 170 acres of land, The Lexington Cemetery has over 200 species of trees including dogwoods, color crab apples, ornamental magnolias and pink weeping cherries. Throughout the season, cemetery visitors can find beautiful gardens of annuals and perennials.

Learn more about the horticultural aspects of The Lexington Cemetery with our Tree Guide.

Lexington Cemetery Tree Guide
Lexington Cemetery Tree Guide

Cemetery Birds

The Lexington Cemetery is more than a place of serenity for those buried there. It is a community memorial grounds that celebrates life in a park-like setting. In spring, an avenue of dogwoods, color crab apples, ornamental magnolias and pink weeping cherries lead to 16,000 blooming tulips and fields of spring beauties. This cemetery is a 170 acre national arboretum with more than 200 species of trees. A mecca for birds, the Audubon Society has identified 179 species on the grounds.

Lexington Cemetery Bird Guide
Lexington Cemetery Bird Guide

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